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Now Maitland Now is Your Time by Thomas Jones Barker. (Y)


Now Maitland Now is Your Time by Thomas Jones Barker. (Y)

The Duke of Wellington orders Maitland to move the infantry of the guard forward at the climax of the Battle of Waterloo during the Napoleonic war.
Item Code : DHM0197YNow Maitland Now is Your Time by Thomas Jones Barker. (Y) - This Edition
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EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. (One reduced to clear)

Ex display canvas in near perfect condition.
Image size 40 inches x 30 inches (102cm x 76cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £320.00

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Other editions of this item : Now Maitland Now is Your Time by Thomas Jones Barker.DHM0197
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print. Image size 30 inches x 21 inches (76cm x 53cm)noneHalf Price!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £40.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINT Open edition print. Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm)none
B.O.G.O.F.
Now : £15.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 40 inches x 30 inches (102cm x 76cm)none£100 Off!Now : £540.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 21 inches (76cm x 53cm)noneHalf Price!Now : £200.00VIEW EDITION...
POSTCARDPostcard Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£2.00VIEW EDITION...

This Week's Half Price Art

 Probably the best known painting of the gallant charge of the Royal North Dragoons, The Scots Greys at the Battle of Waterloo. According to an eyewitness Alexander Armour at the start of the charge of the greys had to pass through the ranks of the Highland Brigade and armour recalled The highlanders were then ordered to wheel back, when they did so we rushed through them at the same time they heard us calling Now my boys Scotland Forever.

Scotland Forever by Lady Elizabeth Butler.
Half Price! - £38.00
The drummer boys of the 57th (die-hards) drawn up under fire on the ridge of Albuera, (16th May 1811), Peninsula war.

Steady the Drums and Fifes by Lady Elizabeth Butler.
Half Price! - £33.00
 Following an astonishing night march, the tanks of 1st Northamptonshire Yeomanry and men of 1st Battalion Black Watch found themselves ensconced in the village of St. Aignan de Cramesnil some 4 miles behind German lines.  Shortly after noon a small group of Tiger I tanks were spotted advancing north by 3 Troop, A Squadron.  Some minutes later Captain Boardman arrived in his Sherman I and when the enemy were within 800 yards he gave the order to open fire.  The first two shots by the troops Firefly brewed up the rearmost target.  After moving to a new position Trooper Joe Ekins fired again, knocking out a second Tiger.  Finally he turned his attention to the remaining tank, destroying it with two more rounds.  Unknown to the British tankmen at the time it is now believed that the last Tiger was that of the top German tank ace Hauptsturmfurher Michael Wittmann.

The Death of Wittmann, St Aignan de Cramesnil, France, 8th August 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
This is my personal interpretation of the events immediately following the Battle of Culloden. There is no intention to depict either the shores of LochNam-Uarnh, the Highlands, glens or castles with geographic accuracy. Instead I have tried to portray the scenes following the first 3 days of the battle, the escape of Bonnie Prince Charlie, the destruction and brutality wreaked upon the Highlands and the real sufferers, women and the innocent. 1 . The battlefield scene represents the time from plundering and butchering the wounded to when the ordinary people were allowed on to collect their dead. In the main central figure I have tried to impart a feeling of stoic dignity in the face of an uncertain future 2. The top section represents the form of Prince Charles. Despite the flames and carnage of Culloden, he is firmly supported in the hand of his Jacobite faithful to his safe exile aboard a French warship. Being mindfull that Clan tartans were not in common usage as uniforms of war at the time, only one tartan has been represented as such, that of the Royal Stewart, and that only to signify Charles claim to the thrones of England and Scotland. With his leaving, the sett fades as does he and his ambition. The burning, smouldering tartans signify the proscription of tartans, kilts, plaids etc by Westminster to discourage further rebellion. 3. With the Clans and their regiments broken, neither the natural barrier of the Highlands nor the great chiefs castles would prevent the poison of Culloden seeping into every glen or the fury of Cumberlands dragoons plundering at will. This is represented in the lower section. Armed with sword, manacles and the noose, these, Cumberlands most pitiless embarked on an orgy of murder, rape and pillage. The abyss of prison or exile awaited those suspected of Jacobite sympathies, the gallows for more serious resistance. Battles are fought and won, or lost, as all battles are, but Cullodens aftermath changed Scottish Highland society forever, ushering in a long period of suffering. This painting is my humble attempt to interpret that tragic period.

Culloden the Aftermath by Brian Wood (GS)
Half Price! - £300.00

DHM835GL. 19th Regiment Artillery (The Highland Gunners) by David Rowlands.
19th Regiment Artillery (The Highland Gunners) by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Objective Brass, 26th February 1991.  At the forefront of the Fusiliers Battle Group throughout the land war was the Recce Platoon.  Once in the desert, it became part of the Reconnaissance Group which was formed to provide a force with an integral anti-tank capability.  Such a unit was able to act independently and defend itself, should the need arise.  The Recce Group was commanded by Major Corin Pearce.  4th Armoured Brigade attacked the enemy formations sequentially, and as the Battle Group paused on Objective COPPER SOUTH, the Reconnaissance Group moved forward to screen the formation and establish the Forming Up Position (FUP) for the forthcoming attack on Objective BRASS.  Corporal Derek McManus of The Queen's Own Highlanders in his CVR(T) Scimitar (callsign Two Three Alpha) encountered an Iraqi command bunker, and ordered an Iraqi to tell those inside to surrender.  The occupants refused, so McManus threw an L2A2 grenade into the doorway of the bunker.  With Corporal Dave Weaver, from his MCT(S) Spartan (callsign Four One Bravo), he moved forward on foot but came under fire from the Iraqi in a trench.  The Scimitar's 30mm Rarden cannon fired a sabot round and Corporal McManus fired his CLAW rifle grenade, but the fire from the trench continued so both he and Weaver rushed back to their vehicles.  With considerable presence of mind, Fusilier Anthony Cassar, the driver of callsign Four One Bravo, stood up in his hatch and fired his rifle, shooting the Iraqi soldier dead.  Captain Guy Briselden, the Milan Platoon Commander, led his men (almost all of whom were Queen's Own Highlanders) on foot to clear the enemy trench system, advancing by fire and movement.  He cleared several bunkers as he and the Highlanders moved through the extensive trench system, which the enemy had had many months to prepare, under the supporting fire of two Warriors.  Many Iraqis subsequently surrendered.  For his inspirational leadership in this exploit of arms Captain Briselden was awarded the Military Cross.

Reconnaissance Group Action, 3rd Fusiliers Battle Group by David Rowlands. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Royal Engineers Churchill AVREs of 6th Assault Regiment, 81st Squadron and DD Shermans of the 4/7th Dragoon Guards. Both units were part of perhaps the most important formation involved in the British and Canadian landings, the 79th Armoured Division or Funnies. Composed of a variety of armoured vehicles, designed to support the beach assault troops, they included mine flails, bunker busters, carpet layers, and amphibious tanks.

Gold Beach, Normandy, 6th June 1944 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £1900.00
4th Regiment Royal Artillery Offensive Support Group. Entry into Kosovo, 12th June 1999.

Operation AGRICOLA by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

 

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