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Full Anthony Saunders Print List
FAR0632. Picnic at Buttermere by Rex Preston. <p><p><b>Less than 85 copies of this edition available - sold out at the publisher.</b><b><p>Open edition prints.<p> Size 24 inches x 16 inches (61cm x 41cm)
FAR0943. Loch Garry by Rex Preston. <p> <p><b>Less than 200 copies of this edition available - sold out at the publisher.</b><b><p>Open edition prints.<p> Size 30 inches x 15 inches (76cm x 38cm)

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  Website Price: £ 65.00  

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British Landscape Prints by Rex Preston.

PCK1718. British Landscape Prints by Rex Preston.

Landscape Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

FAR0632. Picnic at Buttermere by Rex Preston.

Less than 85 copies of this edition available - sold out at the publisher.

Open edition prints.

Size 24 inches x 16 inches (61cm x 41cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

FAR0943. Loch Garry by Rex Preston.

Less than 200 copies of this edition available - sold out at the publisher.

Open edition prints.

Size 30 inches x 15 inches (76cm x 38cm)


Website Price: £ 65.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £170.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £105




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

This Week's Half Price Art

In August 1808 the 2nd battalion of the 95th Rifles were part of the expedition commanded by Sir Arthur Wellesley to Portugal and covered the landings at Mondego Bay.  On 15th August during a skirmish at Obidos, they had the distinction of firing the first shots of the Peninsular War against the French.  The Rifles were trained to think quickly and by themselves in dangerous situations, they were also taught to work and fight together in pairs while firing harassing and well aimed shots at the enemy.  The Baker rifle which the 95th used was an accurate weapon for its day, with reported kills being taken up to 270 metres away.  During the Peninsular War, Rifleman Thomas Plunkett of the 1st Battalion, 95th Rifles, shot the French General Auguste-Marie-Francois Colbert at a range that may have been even greater.  Rifleman Thomas Plunkett then shot a second French officer who rode to the general's aid.

Tribute to the 95th Rifles by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £70.00
 Between 27th March and 4th April 2003, C Squadron The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards was attached to 40 Commando Royal Marines on the Al Faw peninsula, Iraq.  Corporal Justin Simons was the squadrons recovery mechanic and Corporal James Garrett was the commander of the squadrons Challenger Armoured Repair and Recovery Vehicle - CRARRV.  On 30th March, 2nd Troop C Squadron was supporting a Royal Marines clearance operation near Abu Al Khasib - Operation JAMES.  A Challenger 2 tank became decisively engaged by the enemy, both its tracks were thrown and it was disabled beside the causeway.  Corporal Garrett was tasked to recover it.  As darkness fell and under attacks from rocket propelled grenades, small arms and mortar fire, Corporal Simons took charge of the recovery operation.  He and Corporal John Morgan dismounted, while Corporal Garrett provided close protection by operating the machine-gun.  The tank was successfully winched onto the road, but then became stranded in an even more difficult position.  For six hours, in complete darkness, Corporals Simons and Morgan struggled to break both tracks conventionally before finally resorting to arc-welding equipment.  Eventually Corporal Simons tried the unorthodox by organizing a CRARRV on CRARRV recovery, which succeeded in dragging the tank to safety, nine hours after it was disabled.  Corporal Garrett and Corporal Simons were both Mentioned in Despatches for their leadership, calmness and disregard for their own safety.

Thrown Tracks by David Rowlands. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
Corporal C.J.G. (Fred) Comber MC and crew of the Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers in action on Bridge 4 over the Shatt al Basra waterway, Iraq, 24th March 2003.
Corporal C.J.G. Comber MC by David Rowlands. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Trapped within a rapidly decreasing perimeter, the exhausted BEF along with elements of the French 1st Army appeared to be at the mercy of the mighty Luftwaffe.  No one though had reckoned on the brilliant leadership of Admiral Ramsay nor the gallant and unstinting efforts of the military and civilians who managed to rescue over 330,000 troops in nine days.

Operation Dynamo, Dunkirk, France 24th May - 4th June 1940 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

Sgt Dowling and L Cpl Evans with the 16th/5th The Queens Royal Lancers.  16th/5th The Queen's Royal Lancers provided the reconnaissance for the 1st (UK) Armoured Division.  On 25th February 1991, the regiment led the advance from Saudi Arabia, through the Iraqi defence line and into Iraq.  The next day, they were attacking the enemy in the area code-named Objective LEAD.  Each squadron of the Regiment had a small tracked logistical element mounted in M548 load carriers crewed by personnel of the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers.  On 26th February, two of these M548s, belonging to C Squadron, were being led by the Squadron Sergeant-Major in his Ferret scout car when an enemy T59 tank appeared and chased them.  One vehicle broke down during the pursuit.  Fortunately, the T59 lost them in the sandstorm, and the other M548 stopped and was able to take off the crew.  As the visibility improved, the tank saw and destroyed the abandoned M548 and gave chase to the remaining one.  Lance Corporal F C Evans was firing his General Purpose Machine Gun (GPMG) from the roof, while Sergeant M J Dowling, leaning out of the cab, bravely tried to distract the tank's aim by firing his rifle at it.  Both men were killed by the tank's machine gun fire.  Sergeant Dowling was posthumously awarded the Military Medal.  This painting was commissioned by the Warrant Officers and Sergeants Mess of 16th/5th The Queen's Royal Lancers, and presented to the Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers.

Sgt Dowling MM & L. Cpl. F. Evans, REME, February 26th 1992 by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
DHM1373GL.   A Squadron, 1st The Queens Dragoon Guards, Al Basrah, Iraq, 2003 by David Rowlands.
A Squadron, 1st The Queens Dragoon Guards, Al Basrah, Iraq, 2003 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Craufurds Light Brigade, of which the 95th Rifles, the 43rd and 52nd, were part of, faces about once more to face the enemy, during the retreat from Spain of Sir John Moores Army. The Light Brigade fought a series of brilliant delaying tactics under the most adverse of conditions during the Peninsula War.

The Rearguard by J P Beadle.
Half Price! - £40.00
18 June 1815: At Waterloo the 33rd took up a position with Major-General Sir Colin Halkett's 5th Brigade in the right centre of the British line. During the day they withstood the French artillery bombardment, but as that fire slackened, the order +Prepare to receive cavalry+ was heard as wave after wave of French cuirassiers, dragoons and lancers advanced towards them up the slope. The redcoats formed squares; the front rank knelt, the butt end of their muskets resting on the ground, their bayonets fixed. The second rank crouched, while the third and fourth ranks stood ready to fire. When the densely packed horsemen were within thirty yards, they opened fire and their musket balls crashed into Ney's cavalry. Riders and their mounts tumbled into heaps just beyond bayonet-reach of the kneeling front ranks. French horsemen who rode around the squares of British infantry suffered a similar fate on each side.  The 33rd fought off four successive cavalry charges, each one resulting in heaps of dead and dying men and horses littered in front of the squares. In the intervals between these attacks, the French artillery took its toll on the British infantry. Within the squares it was impossible for a man to move a yard without stepping on a wounded comrade, or upon the bodies of the dead. The Duke of Wellington rode up to Halkett, who said, +My Lord, we are dreadfully cut up; can you not relieve us for a little while?+  +Impossible!+  +Very well my Lord, we'll stand until the last man falls.+  By 6 pm the French cavalry had been destroyed as a fighting force. The 33rd and the 2nd Battalion 69th, united to form a single battalion due to their losses, then had to face the final attack by the infantry of Napoleon's Imperial Guard.  The painting shows the 33rd in square, with the burning farm of La Haye Sainte beyond. Inside the single square formed with the remnants of the 2/69th, the Colours of both regiments can be seen. (The King's Colour of the 2/69th had been captured by the enemy at Quatre Bras two days earlier).

The 33rd (1st Yorkshire, West Riding ) Regiment at the Battle of Waterloo, 18th June 1815 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £250.00

 

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