Customer Helpline (UK) : 01436 820269

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985


Valuations

Classified Ads Terms and Conditions Shipping Info Contact Details

Aircraft
Search
Ship
Search
Artist
Index
HALF PRICE AND MORE SPECIAL OFFERS
Product Search         
(Exact match search - please check our other menus first)

Full Anthony Saunders Print List
FAR0632. Picnic at Buttermere by Rex Preston. <p><p><b>Less than 85 copies of this edition available - sold out at the publisher.</b><b><p>Open edition prints. <p> Size 24 inches x 16 inches (61cm x 41cm)
FAR0943. Loch Garry by Rex Preston. <p> <p><b>Less than 200 copies of this edition available - sold out at the publisher.</b><b><p>Open edition prints. <p> Size 30 inches x 15 inches (76cm x 38cm)

Please note that our logo (below) only appears on the images on our website and is not on the actual art prints.


When you are ready to add this item to your basket, click the button below.

 

 

  Website Price: £ 65.00  

Quantity:
 

 

British Landscape Prints by Rex Preston.

PCK1718. British Landscape Prints by Rex Preston.

Landscape Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

FAR0632. Picnic at Buttermere by Rex Preston.

Less than 85 copies of this edition available - sold out at the publisher.

Open edition prints. 

Size 24 inches x 16 inches (61cm x 41cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

FAR0943. Loch Garry by Rex Preston.

Less than 200 copies of this edition available - sold out at the publisher.

Open edition prints. 

Size 30 inches x 15 inches (76cm x 38cm)


Website Price: £ 65.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £120.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £55




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

This Week's Half Price Art

 Depicting soldiers of the French Second Empire dreaming of the victorious French Army of the Napoleonic period.
La Reve (The Dream) by Edouard Detaille. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
 Battle of Agincourt, October 25th 1415. Fought during the Hundred years war at the end of the English Invasion of 1415. King Henry the V of England, after his conquest of Harfleur marched his army of 1,000 Knights and 5,000 Archers (many of which were Welsh) towards Calais. He marched to Amiens as flooding had affected the river at the Somme which was the direct route. This delay helped the French army of 20,000 strong under the command of the Constable Charles dAlbret and Marshal Jean Bouciquaut II. The French army blocked Henry V route to Calais, giving the English no choice but to fight. Henry V positioned his army at Agincourt, between to wooded areas giving a frontage of 1100 metres. Henry deployed his force into three divisions; each group had archers at each flank. He had chosen his position well, in front of his army was ploughed fields and due to the heavy raid was very muddy. Due to the narrow battlefield area the French army lost their advantage of superior numbers. At 11 oclock the English started to advance their archers within 2509 yards of the French, getting them into range of the French lines. The French line of Cavalry advanced at a slow pass due to the heavy mud, They took heavy losses from the arrows from the English Long Bowman. They were eventually repulsed by the Archers who as the French cavalry approached changed from using longbows for axes and swords. The French second Cavalry line advanced only to be finally repulsed after hand to hand fighting. The commander Duc dAlencon was killed in the attack. The second charge had failed and many of the French knights were taken prisoner. Believing he had been attacked in the rear Henry V ordered that the prisoners were to be put to death. In fact There was no real rear attack it was French Camp followers plundering the English Camp. The French camp followers were quickly dealt with and the English again prepared itself for the next attack. The third attack never materialized as the sight of so much blood shed and piles of corpses turned the charge into a retreat. The English had won the day with losses less than 1600 compared to the French losses of over 7,000, including the capture of Bouciquaut. Henry V, his way now cleared reached Calais on the 16th November 1415. Agincourt is one of the great battles of military history, and this victory enabled Henry V to return to France in 1417 and conquer all of Normandy.

Morning of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
 Panzer IVF2 tanks of 6th Panzer Division, Panzer Armee Hoth, attempt to fight their way through to the beleaguered Sixth Army at Stalingrad, 12th December 1942.  On the 21st the operation was abandoned when the expected breakout from Stalingrad failed to materialise, the relief column was only 25 miles from the city.

Operation Winter Tempest by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £90.00
Driven by revenge for the brutal treatment she had suffered at the hands of the Romans, Queen Boadicea led the Iceni and her allies the Trinovantas in open revolt. The IX Legion Hispania was despatched to suppress the insurrection but were ambushed en route. Only the commander Petilius Cerealis, and a handful of cavalry escaped.

Ambush of the XI Legion by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - £60.00

 After a major victory at Salamanca (22 July 1812) Wellington occupied Madrid and then advanced to capture Burgos - unfortunately with insufficient siege equipment he was compelled to retire and forced to experience a harrowing retreat, it was, he said The worst scrape. However, when the campaigning season ended, Spain, south of the Tagus, was free of the French.

The Worst Scrape - Retreat from Burgos October/November 1812 by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 Troops of the 1st Hampshires assaulting Gold Beach during the Normandy Landings. Gold beach was one of the British beaches on D-Day. Gold beach was the western most beach of the British beaches, on D-Day. Gold beach was between two twenty metre high cliffs where German fortifications had been built. The beach had been protected by concrete casemates which took some time to break through. This happened with support form British tanks in the afternoon of D-day 6th June. The British tanks and reinforcements moved off the beaches towards Saint-Come-de-Fresene and Arromanches which were both liberated by 9pm.

D-Day Gold Beach, 6th June 1944 by Simon Smith.
Half Price! - £75.00
Very few of the British soldiers made it through the barbed wire defences, and even fewer to the German trenches.  By the end of the first day the British losses were 60,000 men.

The Battle of the Somme - At the German Trenches by Jason Askew. (P)
Half Price! - £3250.00
DHM598P.  Ensign of the 17th regiment of Foot, American War of Independence 1779. by Jim Lancia.

Ensign of the 17th regiment of Foot, American War of Independence 1779. by Jim Lancia (P)
Half Price! - £1050.00

 

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email: