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Full Anthony Saunders Print List
FAR0471.  Forestside by David Dipnall. <p><p><b>Less than 200 copies of this edition available - sold out at the publisher.</b><b><p>Open edition prints. <p> Size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)
FAR0899. Daffodil Walk by David Dipnall. <p><b><p><b>Less than 45 copies of this edition available - sold out at the publisher.</b><p>Open edition prints. <p> Size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)

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  Website Price: £ 90.00  

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England Landscape Prints by David Dipnall.

PCK1709. England Landscape Prints by David Dipnall.

Landscape Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

FAR0471.  Forestside by David Dipnall.

Less than 200 copies of this edition available - sold out at the publisher.

Open edition prints. 

Size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

FAR0899. Daffodil Walk by David Dipnall.

Less than 45 copies of this edition available - sold out at the publisher.

Open edition prints. 

Size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)


Website Price: £ 90.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £127.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £37




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

This Week's Half Price Art

DHM889P.  Winter Fishing by Alan Herriot.

Winter Fishing by Alan Herriot (P)
Half Price! - £2200.00
 The year is 1807, the French Empire is at the pinnacle of its power. Although not yet 38 years of age the Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte is marching towards the heights of his military career. It is the anniversary of his great victory against the Austrians at Marengo seven years before. Since then the soldiers of The Grand Armee have faithfully followed The Little Corporal from victory to victory across Europe.  Now, in eastern Prussia, the Russians alone are holding out against the might of France. Bennigsens army is strung out on a four mile front along the banks of the river Alle, near the town of Friedland. With their backs to the unfordable river the brave Russian soldiers are drawn up in a poor position to give battle.  It is already midday when Napoleon arrives on the field. Much of the French force is still some miles away but the commanders keen eye immediately perceives an opportunity for victory. He decides to attack. The vigourous assault on the Russian lines commences at about 5.30 pm. Bennigsen, anticipating an engagement on the following day, is completely surprised by this ferocious attack so late in the afternoon. The fighting begins as his divisions are preparing to withdraw across the river Alle, to a stronger position. Napoleons master stroke throws the enemy into confusion. By 8.30 pm the French are masters of the field, the Russians have lost nearly a third of their army and 80 cannons. The town of Friedland is ablaze and the Tsars army in full retreat.  In simple attire and characteristically astride a nimble arab grey, Napoleon Bonaparte rides forward with his reserves of the Guard to survey the final victory.  Within a few days the defeated Tsar Alexander will embrace the French Emperor on a raft anchored in the middle of the Niemen at Tilsit. At their monumental meeting they will talk of peace, co-operation against the British, the division of Prussian Territories and France with Russia will form their uneasy alliance that will quickly collapse into open hostility and present Napoleon with his greatest challenge: The invasion of Russia itself.

Napoleon at Friedland by Mark Churms. (AP)
Half Price! - £95.00
Very few of the British soldiers made it through the barbed wire defences, and even fewer to the German trenches.  By the end of the first day the British losses were 60,000 men.

The Battle of the Somme - At the German Trenches by Jason Askew. (P)
Half Price! - £3250.00
 The Jacobite army led by Lord George Murray having fired their first devastating volley, cast down their muskets and pistols to engage Cobhams Dragoons in fierce close quarter combat.

Battle of Falkirk by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - £90.00

A French General followed by his staff officers watch as Grenadiers a Cheval pass.
General of the 1st Empire by Edouard Detaille.
Half Price! - £25.00
 Battle of Agincourt, October 25th 1415. Fought during the Hundred years war at the end of the English Invasion of 1415. King Henry the V of England, after his conquest of Harfleur marched his army of 1,000 Knights and 5,000 Archers (many of which were Welsh) towards Calais. He marched to Amiens as flooding had affected the river at the Somme which was the direct route. This delay helped the French army of 20,000 strong under the command of the Constable Charles dAlbret and Marshal Jean Bouciquaut II. The French army blocked Henry V route to Calais, giving the English no choice but to fight. Henry V positioned his army at Agincourt, between to wooded areas giving a frontage of 1100 metres. Henry deployed his force into three divisions; each group had archers at each flank. He had chosen his position well, in front of his army was ploughed fields and due to the heavy raid was very muddy. Due to the narrow battlefield area the French army lost their advantage of superior numbers. At 11 oclock the English started to advance their archers within 2509 yards of the French, getting them into range of the French lines. The French line of Cavalry advanced at a slow pass due to the heavy mud, They took heavy losses from the arrows from the English Long Bowman. They were eventually repulsed by the Archers who as the French cavalry approached changed from using longbows for axes and swords. The French second Cavalry line advanced only to be finally repulsed after hand to hand fighting. The commander Duc dAlencon was killed in the attack. The second charge had failed and many of the French knights were taken prisoner. Believing he had been attacked in the rear Henry V ordered that the prisoners were to be put to death. In fact There was no real rear attack it was French Camp followers plundering the English Camp. The French camp followers were quickly dealt with and the English again prepared itself for the next attack. The third attack never materialized as the sight of so much blood shed and piles of corpses turned the charge into a retreat. The English had won the day with losses less than 1600 compared to the French losses of over 7,000, including the capture of Bouciquaut. Henry V, his way now cleared reached Calais on the 16th November 1415. Agincourt is one of the great battles of military history, and this victory enabled Henry V to return to France in 1417 and conquer all of Normandy.

Morning of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
DHM594P.  17th Light Dragoons, 1780 by Jim Lancia.
17th Light Dragoons, 1780 by Jim Lancia. (P)
Half Price! - £1000.00
 The Mark IV Tank of Lt. F. MItchell MC, 1st battalion Tank Corps engages A7V tanks at Villers-Bretonneux, 24th April 1918.

The First Tank versus Tank Action by David Rowlands. (Y)
Half Price! - £40.00

 

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